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Bridal Portraits – For Photographers

Not too long ago, my husband Mat and I had a small get together with our friends who work with us for Riverland Studios. If you don’t know about Riverland, my husband and I own it together. It’s a collective group of super talented artists, who are all pros, own their own businesses, but also work with us! We are very blessed to have them as part of our “team.”

So we held a small workshop, and discussed different topics. My platform was bridal portraits. I discussed posing, light, and how I approach these shoots. Everyone has a way of doing things, so I don’t really think there is a right or wrong way, just a personal approach.

After the get-together, I thought it would be a good idea to send out notes of a few examples of photos I had taken, why I used the settings I did, and the result. If you are new to photography, or would just like to see a perspective from me, I hope this will help! I will be sharing more about portraits and discuss lens choice, posing, etc, in the future. 🙂

I hope this helps or inspires you !

 

The light in this room was beautiful and so is Annie! I loved her reflection, and didn’t want to use flash, so I opened my aperture and raised My ISO a little to fill in light on her face. (so you know, I rarely use flash for portraits. Just my style).

Info:
24mm
iso 800
f/1.6
1/500 Sec

 

Tess was obviously VERY backlit. Again, instead of using
flash to brighten her up, I opened my aperture and bumped up the iso. I typically go for a very ethereal portrait, and it works here. I used this alcove as a “frame” for her.

INFO:
24mm
iso 1250
f/2.5
1/640 sec

The 35mm lens is awesome for getting a little more of the scene without warping. I posed Brittany in a sort of “flapper” style pose. 🙂

35mm
iso 250
f/1.4
1/320 sec

Shooting WIDE at f/1.2 is tricky, but makes a such a beautiful portrait….skin looks soft and with a 50mm it’s the perfect lens for a classic posed portrait.
50mm
iso 500
f/1.2
1/200 sec

A few examples of where I didn’t shoot “wide open.”

I wanted to show the detail of the sky and Dana’s dress flowing.

24mm
iso 800
f/4.5
1/3200 sec

I purposely shot this at f/10. The light was bright and I didn’t want to blow out the sky, and wanted everything to be sharp.

24mm
iso 250
1/320 sec
f/10

Same with this one… I wanted alot of detail because of her dress and the sky was amazing. (I typically shoot “wide open,” but here that wouldn’t have made sense because I would have lost the clouds which made it more dynamic).

24mm
iso 250
1/640 sec
f/6.3


Again, I wanted to keep detail here. it wouldn’t have made sense to shoot wide open-she is close to the wall and I wanted the shutters to be in focus too.
24mm
1/400 sec
f/4.0
iso 320

  • Juliet Elizabeth Photography - Learning to photograph bridal portraits? Here are some tips! 🙂

  • BammerPhotography - Some really great tips!!! I’m shooting my first wedding this summer so this was really helpful! Thanks! 😀

  • Bethany Cox - wow! this was so helpful! I’m bookmarking this one for sure! Thank you friend 🙂

  • Patti Armbruster - Visiting your website is always an inspiration. I hope posts like these keep coming! Thank you thank you thank you!!!

  • audra - amazing share here…